Monday, September 30, 2013

When Mountains Move by Julie Cantrell

About the Book:
When Mountains Move, by Julie Cantrell, is the sequel to the Christy Award winning Book of the Year and Debut Novel of the Year, Into the Free, which earned a starred review from Publishers Weekly and became both a New York Times and USA TODAY bestseller.

It is the spring of 1943. With a wedding and a cross-country move, Millie’s world is about to change forever.

If only her past could change with it.

Soon after the break of day, Bump will become Millie’s husband. And then, if all goes as planned, they will leave the rain-soaked fields of Mississippi and head for the wilds of the Colorado Rockies. As Millie tries to forget a dark secret, she hasn’t yet realized how drastically those past experiences will impact the coming days.

For most of Millie’s life, being free felt about as unlikely as the mountains moving. But she’s about to discover that sometimes in life, we are given second chances, and that the only thing bigger than her past … is her future.


 


Book Excerpt:

Friday May 7, 1943

Church bells strike to announce the hour. My body quakes from the force of the sound, and again from the force of the man, uninvited. He pushes me down, nails his elbow into my throat. I fight, kicking, clawing. Screaming.

Someone calls my name. “Millie?” 

I throw my fists into the night, lunging white-eyed toward the voice.

 “Millie! Stop! It’s me.” Bump wraps his arms around me, and I jerk back, pushing against him. He withdraws, asking, “You okay?”

I don’t answer. Instead, I stare at the pitch of the darkened ceiling and pull myself from the depths of the dream.



To buy the book, go here:
juliecantrell.wordpress.com/


About the Author:
Julie Cantrell is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of Into the Free, the Christy Award winning Book of the Year 2013 and recipient of the Mississippi Library Association’s Fiction Award. Cantrell has served as editor-in-chief of the Southern Literary Review and is a recipient of the Mississippi Arts Commission Literary Fellowship. Her second novel, When Mountains Move, released September 2013.

Connect with Julie here:
Website: www.juliecantrell.com
Blogsite: www.juliecantrell.wordpress.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/juliecantrellauthor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/JulieCantrell
Email: julie@juliecantrell.com


Julie is giving away a copy of When Mountains Move. The giveaway is only available to U.S. addresses.
To be entered in the book giveaway, leave a comment along with your email address. You may enter the book giveaway twice--once on each spotlight post. (It's not too late to go back and leave a comment on yesterday's post)







Happy Reading!
Caroline Brown














Sunday, September 29, 2013

A Welcome Back to Jo Huddleston

Hello Jo! Is there a story behind your new release, Claiming Peace?

My ancestors and I were raised in the Southern Appalachians of East Tennessee. At family reunions I would listen to stories the older generations would tell about time before automobiles and telephones. I wanted to write a story about their times--a time before I was born. Thus, I wrote the Caney Creek Series. Claiming Peace is the third book in the series, which follows the Callaway family and friends from 1928 to 1951.

What’s your favorite genre of writing?

In fiction I’m published in Southern historical. My first book in the Caney Creek Series started in the years prior to the Great Depression and continued into the Depression years. Some folks say it was a sad book. It was the reality of the setting. I’ll probably stay with this genre although I plan to intersperse more humor to lighten the mood. I have done that some in Beyond the Past, the second book in the series.

What is your favorite season of the year? 
  
Fall would be my favorite season because it’s not yet turned cold and the hot days of summer are going away. I could live anyplace where the temperature  would be 80 degrees all the time.

Where is your favorite place to travel/vacation in?

The beaches of the Gulf of Mexico, specifically around Pensacola.

How do people react when they find out you write?

The funniest reaction I got was from a twenty-something. When she heard me talking about my books, she asked me, “You mean if I google you, you’ll be there?”

Share a verse or Scripture passage with us that is special to you.
Philippians 4:8. If all populations held those thoughts, what a change for good we’d see.

What are your five favorite words?

Jesus, positive, hopeful, enthusiastic, smiling


When is your next book due out and can you tell us about it?

I've just finished the Caney Creek Series and am promoting it now. I have ideas for another Southern series but nothing is finalized at this time.

Connect with Jo Huddleston at:


Jo Huddleston is giving away a copy of Claiming Peace. To be entered in the giveaway, leave a comment along with your email address. You can enter the book giveaway twice—once on each Spotlight post for the author. Please note: The giveaway is for U.S. addresses only.



Saturday, September 28, 2013

Claiming Peace by Jo Huddleston

Facing her lowest moments, Callie’s life begins to crumble.
As he’s done with others of his extended family, can Jim help her find peace?

Visit again the Callaway family and friends in 1951 who live in the Southern Appalachians of East Tennessee. Why did Callie have an appointment with a neurologist? Will she work her way through whatever lies ahead for her and her family? Does Emmajean’s attraction for the young lawyer, Terry, blossom further or die on the vine when he wants her to meet his parents? Can Caroline and Jim find happiness in their long-delayed marriage? You’ll meet some new characters as the Callaway saga continues. Follow the Callaway family throughout the Caney Creek Series—live their triumphs, sorrows, achievements, and losses.



Excerpt

Chapter 1

August 1951
East Tennessee

Callie had not wanted to see her son. Not in that place. The Gateway House. Residency rehabilitation, the judge called it. Family weekend visits.

Returning home and leaving Art behind tore away jagged chunks of Callie's heart. Miles sped by in silence. Callie could hardly breathe past the lump of grief in her throat. How long must Art stay there? The judge said that would be up to Art. He could turn his life around anytime he chose.

Callie's husband, Arthur, and their teenage daughter, Jennifer, tried to carry on a conversation that would coax Callie out of her remorse. That didn't work. Her son remained in that place and the car took them farther from him with each turn of the tires. Despair crouched in a corner of Callie's heart over the recent life-threatening health diagnosis from her neurologist. A diagnosis she and Arthur had not revealed to their children.

Jennifer regarded her mother with caution. "Mother, are you hungry? We could stop for a bite to eat and not have to fix a meal when we get home."


Callie shook her head. She had no energy for more.



About The Author:


Jo Huddleston's debut novel, That Summer, released in December 2012 as the first book in The Caney Creek Series. Book 2, Beyond the Past, released April 2013. Huddleston holds a B.A. degree with honors from Lincoln Memorial University (TN), and is a member of their Literary Hall of Fame. She earned a M.Ed. degree from Mississippi State University. Professional membership: American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW).





Purchase Claiming Peace at:

 Amazon
Jo Huddleston is giving away a copy of Claiming Peace. To be entered in the giveaway, leave a comment along with your email address. You can enter the book giveaway twice—once on each Spotlight post for the author. Please note: The giveaway is for U.S. addresses only.





Friday, September 27, 2013

Maine Author Carla Olson Gade

Welcome to the Barn Door Book Loft, Carla! Is there a story behind Mistletoe Memories?

In 1815 the mineral spring on Schooley's Mountain, the setting for Mistletoe Memories, was declared the purest and best chalybeate water known at that time in the country. Before the days that the wealthy resorted to the shore, they retreated to this mountain spring in Washington County, New Jersey. George Washington even stayed at the renowned Health House resort as well as many more of the rich and famous throughout its years of popularity. Today, the mountain spring is hidden and unused, concealed during road work of the 20th century. The authors are glad to bring this remote place to life again in our book.

What’s the first thing you ever wrote that you still have?

It’s a reproduction of Joan Walsh Anglund’s children’s book What Color is Love (1966). I created a tiny book and bound it with a brass fastener. I copied the words and illustrated it with my crayons. I obviously didn’t know about copyright laws then, I was only five or six at the time. As far as original work, I have a poem that I wrote in fourth grade and a short story from fifth grade.

Who is the most fun character you ever created?
 

I always have fun writing children into my stories. In Mistletoe Memories you’ll meet a little boy named Rory Schroeder.  I’m especially fond of boys since I have two of my own and a grandson so he was fun to write about. He’s a deep thinker, very bright, and rambunctious! When Rory is anxious he rambles out his thoughts in German, the language spoken at home.

Do you believe in writer’s block? If so how often do you get it? How do you fix it?

It happens, for sure. And for me it usually shows up about chapter five. But I don’t believe in giving in to it. Writer’s block is not an excuse for not writing especially when you are on deadline. When I get stumped my solution is prayer. I begin to brainstorm and with God’s direction he opens up the door of creativity. I often find that my story takes a unique turn, that had I not been stuck, I wouldn’t have found. Writing is always an adventure!

Do you ever go back to an old idea long after you abandoned it? 

I never really abandon ideas, I’d say they are archived. Once a story has begun to be told it never really dies. If I decide to put it away it is often because another story takes precedence or calls out to me to be written. I have many tales tucked away and I have returned to some incrementally, especially those that require a great deal of research. Some stories require brewing over a long period of time. Now that I am published, contracts usually dictate the stories I write and others have to wait.

Are you concerned with spelling and grammar as you write? 

I do quick edits as I go along, thanks to Microsoft Word that points them out. Then after each chapter I do another scan before sending it off to my “first editor” who goes over the chapter, while I continue on to the next. She calls me with spelling and grammar edits, and general observations. We do this over the phone, although it could be done with track changes in MW. But she’s my Mom so it’s good to talk and sometimes we’ll discuss other potential revisions. We repeat the process until the book is completed.

What distracts you from writing the easiest? 

Email, social networking, marketing, blogging, but that’s all part being a writer. Moderation matters. But really it is more that
writing distracts me from other things…like eating, housework, socializing.

When is your next book due out and can you tell us about it?

Guideposts is releasing A Cup of Christmas Cheer this fall, a Christmas short story anthology. In it you’ll find my tale called “Upon a Christmas Tree Schooner”. It’s a story of love and healing in the 19th century when a captain on the great lakes brings a haul of Christmas trees to eager German immigrants and in the process finds the love of a little boy.


Thanks for sharing with us today! Best wishes on your writing adventures!

Connect with Carla Olson Gades at:


Blogs




Carla Olson Gade is giving away a copy of Mistletoe Memories. To be entered in the giveaway, leave a comment along with your email address. You can enter the book giveaway twice—once on each Spotlight post for the author. Please note: The giveaway is for U.S. addresses only.



Thursday, September 26, 2013

Mistletoe Memories / Tis The Season by Carla Olson Gade

Spend a heartfelt Christmas on Schooley’s Mountain as four generations make a house a home. Carpenter Stephan Yost vows to build a precocious spinster a home by Christmas. Civil War widow Mary Ann Plum learns the greatest peace on earth comes from giving and receiving love. Olympia Paris must protect the orphanage she grew up in from a man intending to play Father Christmas to most of the town. Joy Benucci turns to a modern-day Scrooge to save a transitional home for foster kids. Will Christmas be a season of miracles in their lives?
’Tis the Season (1820, Schooleys Mountain Springs, New Jersey)

Stephan Yost, resident carpenter of Schooley’s Mountain, New Jersey’s fashionable resort, spends off-season working on repairs, renovations, and constructing new buildings. When he is hired to build a permanent home for the resort's physician and his spirited daughter, Annaliese Braun, in time for Christmas, Stephan finds himself enamored by the precocious spinster. But will he be able to compete for her affections against the advances of a manipulative iron baron? 
Excerpt

‘Tis the Season

Schooley’s Mountain Springs
Washington Township, New Jersey
Late October 1820

            Slow there, boys. Whoa, Hippocrates. Whoa, Galen!”
Annaliese Braun arched back as she drew in the reins with a firm grip. Spooked by a high-pitched whistle, the pair of riled horses continued their unsteady trot. The conveyance
shook and the horses lurched ahead. The carriage shuddered beneath her as she tried to maintain control and pull the horses to a stop.
“Ea–sy fellas,” Annaliese called out to them, peering at the packed dirt road before her. The carriage felt askew. She leaned over and beheld the large wheel wobbling at her side, looking up in time to see a large branch strewn across the mountain road. The team shifted and with a jolt, angled back.
            The rear wheels of the wagon slid into the wide gulch at the side of the road. Wet with leaves from last night’s storm, the slippery descent tipped the carriage at a precarious angle on
the uneven terrain. The carriage rocked from side to side, back and forth, as the horses wrestled to gain footing.
I must stop the horses! Annaliese moved to the edge of the footboard of her father’s red landau. As she felt for the tread, her cotton pelisse caught on the side lantern. She steadied the toe of her ankle-boot on the small step and tugged at her long cloak. As she struggled to free herself, the horses bucked and knocked her onto the damp ground where she landed in a most unladylike fashion. Hippocrates and Galen shuffled about as they dug their hooves into the rocky, leaf-strewn slope.
            She looked up at the carriage looming over her, trying to find her voice. The harnesses pulled taut and the wheels rolled forward—toward her legs beneath the coach. Annaliese pushed against the ground trying to move, when strong arms grabbed her by the shoulders, hoisting her from harm’s way.
She landed with her back against a warm, thumping, masculine chest, facing the bent knees of buckskin breeches tucked into knee boots. “The horses!” she screeched out. “I am
all right, please get them!”
“You are sure?” he asked, with a slight guttural intonation.
“Please, hurry!” Schnell!
The man sprang to his feet and climbed up the shallow embankment to the road, running after the confused horses. He took hold of Galen’s harness and yanked back. “Ho. . . halte,” he called out, working his way in front of the team, bringing them to a stop. Hippocrates tossed his head and blew out reverberating snorts.
The man led the horses to a small glade off the side of the road, drawing the faltering carriage behind them.
Annaliese was taking deep breaths, trying to regain her senses, when the handsome rescuer squatted down in front of her, taking deep breaths of his own. His green eyes, brightened
by his ruddy face, gazed at her intently. “Miss Braun, it is good to meet you at last,” he said, a subtle inflection of Dutch upon his tongue.
            Annaliese blinked. It really was he, and she was not dreaming after all. The man she’d longed to meet, had continued to avoid all summer, took her by the hands and gently pulled her to her feet. She rose, finding herself in such proximity to him that there was nothing else she could say but, “Why, Mr. Yost, how do you do?”
“Stephan, if you please, miss,” the Heath House resident carpenter said, taking a few steps back from her. “It is what I am accustomed to.” His eyes roamed the top of her head with
curiosity. “To answer your question, I believe I fare better than you this day.”
From the corner of her eye, Annaliese noted her plaid chin ribbon dangling somewhere in the vicinity of her temple. She winced. “I must be quite a sight.” She lifted her hands and felt
the disheveled state of her bonnet.
A crooked grin rose above Stephan’s cleft chin.
Annaliese withdrew her bonnet of braided straw and gathered taffeta, and her thick plait plopped onto her shoulder. She often wove her unruly locks into a neat coif surrounding the crown of her head, but the pins from the back must have come undone, as had her pride.
She released a deep sigh as she glanced down at the hat, turning it about in her hands.  The back was crushed and fall leaves were plastered to it. “Perhaps I should begin a new fashion and leave them.” A nervous laugh escaped her lips and she began to pluck the leaves from amongst the small plumes and other trimmings. “I should have thought of it before the resort guests went back to their grand homes in the cities. They could have shared the latest fall headdress with their elegant friends.” Enough of her nervous chatter. What did he know of fashion, with his rugged apparel befitting a tradesman?
Stephan nodded, muffling a laugh, and turned to look at the horses.
As he did so, Annaliese pulled off her soggy chamois driving gloves and discreetly felt the back of her pelisse, finding that the damp ground had saturated the fabric.
“If you are all right, Miss Braun, we should see to the horses and your carriage.”
“Yes, of course.”
Stephan took long strides up the incline and turned to her, extending his hand. She placed her ungloved hand in his firm grip and he carefully helped her to the road. Then the handsome Dutchman motioned for her to walk ahead of him.
“You may go ahead, thank you.” She fanned her warm face with her gloves in the absence of her fan. Who would have ever expected to need a fan on a morning outing in the country in late October? She followed Stephan to the roadside patch where her geldings nosed through wet leaves and nibbled on the spiky grass. Careful to keep her backside away from Stephan’s view, she worked her way around the team and wagged her finger at them. “Hippocrates and Galen. You have been most naughty today. There shall be no carrots for you.”
Stephan’s eyebrows lifted. “Hippocrates and Galen?”
“My father named them after the ancient physicians,” she answered. Stephan issued a slow nod.
Annaliese raised her brow and shrugged. Did he understand the logic or simply find their names peculiar?
            He cocked his head. “Now tell me, Miss Braun, how did your intelligent horses deposit you and your carriage into that gulch?”
Annaliese swallowed. Gulch? It was a gulch all right, and she had fallen straight in. Stephan Yost may have rescued her, but her heart was in the precarious position of rebelling
against her plans for the future.



About The Author

Carla Olson Gade has been imagining stories most her life. Her love for writing and eras gone by turned her attention to writing historical Christian romance. She is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers. An autodidact, creative thinker, and avid reader, Carla also enjoys genealogy, web design, and photography. A native New Englander, she writes from her home in beautiful rural Maine where she resides with her “hero” husband and two young adult sons.
Purchase Mistletoe Memories at:
Carla Olson Gade is giving away a copy of Mistletoe Memories. To be entered in the giveaway, leave a comment along with your email address. You can enter the book giveaway twice—once on each Spotlight post for the author. Please note: The giveaway is for U.S. addresses only.




Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Greetings from Haiti

Husband and I are visiting our Son, Daughter-in-Love and Grands here in Haiti. Yesterday I sewed a dress for Daughter-in-love. Today I ironed. It is HOT down here people. So I am brain fried. I hope you will forgive me for waiting on the winners list until I can get back to the normal--for me--climate of Ohio where my brain is programmed to work better. You do  have another week to comment on the books that would have been announced today.
Photos to show you how beautiful it is here, in spite of the heat.
Hotel where we took the kids this past week-end
Talk to you more next week!

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Writers in Wonderland: Keeping Your Words Legal by Kathryn Page Camp

Back Cover Blurb
HOW DO YOU AVOID A LEWIS CARROLL WONDERLAND OF DEFAMATION LAWSUITS, PLAGIARISM SCANDALS, AND IRS PROCEEDINGS?

Many writers see the law as a Lewis Carroll fantasy—inside out and totally illogical. They would rather write than worry about legal issues. But authors who ignore the law are the real residents of Wonderland.

Writers in Wonderland was written for writers, not lawyers. It uses everyday language and shares cases with interesting facts to explain the basic legal principles of interest to writers. These include copyrights and defamation and book contracts.


So join Lewis Carroll and his characters as they help you avoid the King and Queen of Hearts’ courtroom.

Book Excerpt


CHAPTER TWO
A Mad Tea-Party
(Copyright Background)
“Take some more tea,” the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.
“I’ve had nothing yet,” Alice replied in an offended tone, “so I can’t take more.”
“You mean you can’t take less,” said the Hatter: “it’s very easy to take more than nothing.”
Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
Lewis Carroll was a master at using words literally to change their meaning, as in the passage above. A second-class imitator who is writing a book about legal issues for writers might rework the passage this way:
“Have a copyright,” the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.
“I’ve written nothing yet,” Alice replied in an offended tone, “so I can’t have a right to it.”
“You mean you can’t have a write,” said the Hatter: “it’s very easy to have a right to nothing.”
Reality is nearly as confusing. Shouldn’t it be “copywrite” because it is about what people write? Or is “copyright” the better term because it deals with legal rights? The latter spelling is correct: a copyright is the right to control the copying of what you write or draw or record.
Even so, it isn’t an inalienable right or even one you’ve earned.
Copyright isn’t a reward: it’s a bribe. It isn’t wages for an author or artist’s finished work: it’s motivation to start working in the first place.
Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution gives Congress the power “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”
Writing is a “useful Art.” Yes, even when the writer creates garbage. Since no one knows who the next William Shakespeare is until she’s written something, the rules must encourage everyone equally.
Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks
So what does the Constitution mean by “sciences and useful arts”? The modern terminology is “intellectual property,” and there are three main types: patents, copyrights, and trademarks.
A patent is the right to prohibit others from manufacturing, using, or selling your invention. Actually, it’s much more complicated than that, but this simplified definition is sufficient for most purposes. While many people think in terms of physical things like machinery or medicine, the government also gives patents on new methods and processes.
Broadly defined, a trademark is a word or symbol or a combination of the two that identifies goods produced by a particular manufacturer (e.g., Nike) or services from a particular provider (e.g., FedEx). Once consumers recognize the mark, competitors may not use it on similar goods or services without the owner’s consent. There are very few restrictions on a writer’s use of trademarks, but a later chapter will discuss the consequences of referring to trademarked goods in a manuscript.
Copyright, on the other hand, has a huge impact on writers. In simple terms, copyright is the right to control the copying, modification, publication, performance, and public display of a creative work. For writers, it protects the original arrangement of words. This includes protection against paraphrases that are close enough to the original work for people to recognize. Copyright does not, however, protect against similar works and word arrangements that the second author came up with independently.
The history of copyright dates back to the development of the printing press, and its original use was for the written word, so spelling it “copywrite” would make sense. Over the years, however, copyright expanded to include drawings and paintings and photographs and television programs and You-Tube videos and Internet websites. As Chapter 5 explains, however, it does not allow the copyright owner to prohibit all uses of his or her creative works.
Most of our rights and responsibilities as U.S. citizens are governed by state law. So why does the Constitution elevate intellectual property rights to the federal level? Because they reach across state lines.
The Supreme Court has addressed these rights numerous times, and you may be surprised at the Court’s view. Here is its description of copyright law as summarized in Twentieth Century Music Corp. v. Aiken. (The quote is found at 422 U.S. 151, 156 (1975), and the footnotes are omitted.)
The immediate effect of our copyright law is to secure a fair return for an “author’s” creative labor. But the ultimate aim is, by this incentive, to stimulate artistic creativity for the general public good.
In other words, a writer doesn’t receive the copyright because he deserves it. He gets it as an incentive to keep writing. It’s all about the public good.








To buy Kathryn's book:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble







About Kathryn:


A licensed attorney, Kathryn Page Camp is the author of the non-fiction books "Writers in Wonderland: Keeping Your Words Legal" (KP/PK Publishing 2013) and "In God We Trust: How the Supreme Court's First Amendment Decisions Affect Organized Religion" (FaithWalk Publishing 2006) as well as numerous articles. When she isn’t writing, Kathryn enjoys reading, photography, and sailing Lake Michigan with her husband of thirty-plus years. They have two children and a son-in-law and live in Northwest Indiana. You can find Kathryn on the web at www.kathrynpagecamp.com.  




To connect with Kathryn:
www.kathrynpagecamp.com
http://kathrynpagecamp.blogspot.com


Kathryn Page Camp is giving away a copy of Writers in Wonderland: Keeping Your Words Legal. The giveaway is only available to U.S. addresses.

To be entered in the book giveaway, leave a comment along with your email address. You may enter the book giveaway twice -- once on each spotlight post. (It's not too late to go back and leave a comment on yesterday's post.)


Off to read another great book!
Sandra M. Hart

Monday, September 23, 2013

Kathryn Page Camp Visits the Barn Door

Is there a story behind your book Writers in Wonderland: Keeping Your Words Legal?
As a lawyer who is also a writer, I have long been interested in the issues covered by this book. Through the years other writers have asked me legal questions that I was happy to answer or, in many cases, to research and then answer. Encouragement from my fellow writers became the primary motivation for writing the book.

What started you on your writing journey?
I started writing in high school, but after publishing a few poems in a regional magazine and having two short stories rejected by national magazines, I turned my attention to writing briefs and professional articles as part of my legal career. Then, about ten years ago, I read If You Want to Walk on Water, You Have to Get Out of the Boat by John Ortberg, and God used it to convict me that I should be writing for him. That’s when I began writing non-fiction for the Christian market.

What kind of books do you enjoy reading?
I love reading traditional mysteries (Agatha Christie, P.D. James) and middle-grade children’s books. I also read some classic authors and have just discovered Anthony Trollope. Most of the non-fiction I read is historical or biographical.
Among my recent favorites are Life of Pi (young adult) by Yann Martel, Requiem: Poems of the Terezin Ghetto (poetry) by Paul B. Janeczko, and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (non-fiction) by Rebecca Skloot.

If you were a style of music, what style would you be?
I’d be what most people think of as classical, which includes more than the so-called classical era. But that still covers a wide range, and I’d rather be a lively and unexpected and slightly unorthodox piece, such as Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, rather than a slower and more predictable (but still marvelous) Bach cantata.

What is your favorite season of the year? 
I love them all, but I especially enjoy autumn with its gorgeous color.

What do you like most about the area where you live and/or grew up?
I live in Indiana just outside Chicago, and I love it. There are so many reasons: numerous cultural activities, including some great museums; all four seasons to experience; multiple colleges and universities; and a large lake to sail on.

What is a favorite memory from your childhood?
We lived in Scotland the year I was in 6th grade, and we spent the Christmas holidays on the Isle of Tiree in the Inner Hebrides. There were a number of flat-topped boulders on the shore across from our cottage, and I used to pretend that each boulder was a separate department in a department store. I was Meg and Jo and Beth and Amy (each of the Little Women) in turn, buying Christmas presents with my dollar.

Where is your favorite place to travel/vacation in?
My husband and I like going places we haven’t been before, so we don’t often return to the same place. But my favorites are Scotland and Istanbul (with a side trip to Ephesus).

How is Writers in Wonderland different from other books on the market?

I’d be the first to admit that there are a number of other legal-themed books for writers, and I used many of them as a starting point for my own research. But they aren’t always easy for non-lawyers to understand, and those that manage to limit the legalese tend to be boring. I’d like to think that this book is unique among the competition because it entertains while teaching.


Writers in Wonderland has a Lewis Carroll theme, and you even included some of his poems in the appendices. How did you come up with that idea?

I don’t remember why, but I used phrases from Alice in Wonderland for the chapter titles in one section. Someone from my writers’ critique group said they sounded out of place and I should either eliminate the references or expand them to the entire book. I had been looking for a way to make the book more interesting, so I chose the “expand” option. I’m glad I did, because finding passages that worked was half the fun of writing the book.


When is your next book due out and can you tell us about it?
I’m trying to break into the Christian fiction market. I have a completed novel about a minister’s wife with an abortion in her past and a teenage member of the congregation whose parents are pressuring her to take the same step, and my current work-in-progress involves a young attorney who idolizes her father until his pedestal shatters under him. No nibbles yet, but, as Orphan Annie sings, “Tomorrow is only a day away.”

Positive comments from Author Michael Poore
Michael Poore, author of Up Jumps the Devil, says: “Writers in Wonderland isn’t just informative and wise, it is FUN! Finally, a lawyer who can be helpful without making us want to scream.”


Back Cover Blurb
HOW DO YOU AVOID A LEWIS CARROLL WONDERLAND OF DEFAMATION LAWSUITS, PLAGIARISM SCANDALS, AND IRS PROCEEDINGS?

Many writers see the law as a Lewis Carroll fantasy—inside out and totally illogical. They would rather write than worry about legal issues. But authors who ignore the law are the real residents of Wonderland.

Writers in Wonderland was written for writers, not lawyers. It uses everyday language and shares cases with interesting facts to explain the basic legal principles of interest to writers. These include copyrights and defamation and book contracts.

So join Lewis Carroll and his characters as they help you avoid the King and Queen of Hearts’ courtroom.

To buy Kathryn's book:

About Kathryn:

A licensed attorney, Kathryn Page Camp is the author of the non-fiction books "Writers in Wonderland: Keeping Your Words Legal" (KP/PK Publishing 2013) and "In God We Trust: How the Supreme Court's First Amendment Decisions Affect Organized Religion" (FaithWalk Publishing 2006) as well as numerous articles. When she isn’t writing, Kathryn enjoys reading, photography, and sailing Lake Michigan with her husband of thirty-plus years. They have two children and a son-in-law and live in Northwest Indiana. You can find Kathryn on the web at www.kathrynpagecamp.com.  

To connect with Kathryn:
http://kathrynpagecamp.blogspot.com



Kathryn Page Camp is giving away a copy of Writers in Wonderland: Keeping Your Words Legal. The giveaway is only available to U.S. addresses.

To be entered in the book giveaway, leave a comment along with your email address. You may enter the book giveaway twice -- once on each spotlight post. (It's not too late to go back and leave a comment on yesterday's post.)


Off to read another great book!
Sandra M. Hart



Sunday, September 22, 2013

A Warm Welcome to Jo Walker

Is there a story behind your book Willing to Die?

Yes, indeed. My writing only began just under five years ago. My bio explains how it became part of my life. I had heard about John Munteans life through my daughter who is friends with John’s oldest son. At that time, I had been writing my first fiction, Hope. Upon hearing about John’s story, I said, “Oh I would love to write it.”

She responded, “He already is writing it, himself.”

That ended the idea for me, until a couple years later, three months after my husband had passed away. I was still working as a CNA in our local hospital long term care center. Nights.

I had taken a month leave of absence to be with my daughter who was struggling with her dad’s passing. On March 12, 2012, I received a call from John’s oldest son, Ovie. He asked me if I would help his father write his book. He had no idea what he was really asking me or anyone else he might ask.

I told him I was honored to be asked and it would have to be clear to me from the Lord, that it indeed was God’s plan and purpose. He sent me the twenty-six pages of his dad’s story which had been translated into English from the Romanian language.

Of course I wanted to write it, but life isn’t and wasn’t then about what I wanted. It had to be God all the way. I wrote Ovie and his father a very long email explaining the writing facts of life, and that anyone doing this would need to do it fulltime and would need to be paid.

After nine days of prayer on both sides, it became clear I was to write the book. I quit my job as a CNA, and went to Costa Mesa, Ca. to do interviews. I stayed with the couple for one month, and did over seventy interviews. Between interviews and research, the writing began in earnest in September of 2012.

I would finish a rough draft and then send it to John to review. He being Romanian born and raised would read it through carefully three times. Any needed corrections were noted. We tried the whole Skype thing, but that really didn’t work. There were language issues, but we muddled our way through them.

Over Christmas I realized I had to get back to Costa Mesa. I was at a standstill. I arrived on Jan. 26th. I stayed with the Munteans once again, interviewing some more and writing 8-11 hours a day. On Monday, Feb. 26th of this year, I had no book proposal, I was three-quarters of the way through the book, I had no publisher in mind, and no one to help edit. One week later on Monday, Mar. 4th, a beautifully edited book proposal, the Prologue and first three chapters were in a publisher’s email waiting to be read. It was, and I received an email back saying he wanted the book.

I have been told over and over again, that is a miracle.

Why did God choose me to write this book? I will be asking Him that when I see Him. J

All I know is He took this new widow, who had only begun to learn how to write, to pen Willing to Die. Even before I knew for certain, even before John Muntean had decided to hire me, God gave me the idea for the prologue, he gave me the very first sentence of the book, and He gave me the very last word of the Romanian part of the story.

What started you on your writing journey?

As I mentioned in my bio, I was selling real estate at the time, and being in my sixties I didn’t want to still be selling real estate when I was eighty-five. So I asked God about any talent I might have. After all, Grandma Moses didn’t begin painting until she was eighty. I had no intention of sitting around in old age. And no I am not eighty-five now. J

One night in late fall of 2008, I finished a poorly written mystery. As I closed the book I said out loud, “I could have written something that good.” The seed went from my mouth to my ears to my heart. So I asked God about it. The rest is history. I began my fiction Hope, without having one bit of knowledge of the writing process.

 

What distracts you from writing the easiest?

I have the ability to organize most anything, except my life. I am on the computer a lot. I facebook, I tweet, I look at tons of email. I am very political and responsible for sending out local tea party email as well. My phone alerts me to emails coming in and sometimes I just have to take a peek.

I have set 1pm as the beginning time to attend to all aspects of writing. But here I am at 9am already doing this.

 

What kind of books do you enjoy reading? (Book recommendations very welcome!)

I like good, well written clean mysteries. I am a J.A. Jance fan. Have read more of her series than any other author. I love wonderfully challenging books like Ted Dekker’s books and series. He is an amazing author. Then of course, Frank Peritti. On the political side I just finished Glenn Beck’s, The Eye of Molloch. I believe that is a must read for those liberty loving patriots who fear for our nation. After they read, Willing to Die, of course.

 

What makes you smile and/or laugh out loud?

A really good joke, a friend I am emailing back and forth who is saying funny outrageous things. Of course, a really funny line in a book or television show. The first book in a series by one of the ACFW author’s, had me in stitches. I was reading it late at night at the Munteans and had to muffle my laughter so as not to wake them. It was so funny, I actually got out of bed, fired up my computer and sent her a message on FB. Now for the title. Fools Rush In by Janice Thompson. Hilarious. That first night I heard myself reading it in a southern accent.


What is your favorite season of the year?

I live in the one of the most beautiful spots in Wyoming. I’m only fifty miles from the east gate into Yellowstone. At five thousand foot elevation, we have the four seasons. Sometimes up to a hundred degrees in the summer, and more often to below zero in the winter. I prefer cold over heat. The wind is crazy. You can have snow in early October and clear into June. Several years ago, it actually snowed on the 4th of July. Living here I have to say, I love what each season offers up.

 

What do you like most about the area where you live and/or grew up?

Most of my life was spent in Oregon, eastern Oregon to be exact. In a small town of fifteen thousand people. That was pretty cool, however I love Wyoming. I love living in Cody. Yes in the fall there is a lot of brown due to the area being high desert, but I look out on two mountains. Cedar and Rattlesnake. Visit my website at
www.josephinewalker.com and pop over to my page called, My Corner. That will answer your question. J

 
Where is your favorite place to travel/vacation in?

I love Europe. I grew up on fairytales, thus my fascination of castles. On a trip to Holland I visited the Kastele DeHaar, near Utrecht. We walked around the bend in the road and there it stood, looking like a Disneyland castle. I was in heaven. The little girl inside was doing a lot of Snoopy dances. Dreams do come true.


What's your favorite meal with family and friends? (and feel free to share a recipe with us!)

This is very easy for me to answer. Any meal with my family. My three children and their families all live around one thousand miles away. I am alone now. Of course any friend that wants to share a meal is a wonderful treat.

The next book I am self-publishing as an ebook, my fiction, Hope. It is currently being macro edited by the same great editor that worked on Willing to Die. It is my intention to have it completed and published by the end of the year, because Bethany is pushing me to make it better.

HOPE is about a thirty-five year old widow, who lost her husband and twin five year old daughters in a car accident. Jessica was driving. Not her fault, but like many she blames herself. The book is about her move to Hope WY., where she wants to find her peace and begin anew. The house she is determined to buy has the dubious reputation of being haunted, and something or someone is as determined to stop her. Her life is almost ended.

 



To buy the book, go here:
amazon


Author Bio:

Josephine Walker a former stay-at-home mom, car sales associate, Realtor and CNA in a long-term care center started her writing career in 2009 after asking God “When I get old, what am I going to be doing? I must have some talent somewhere.” God planted a seed in her heart, gave her the idea for her first book, a fiction called Hope, soon to be published. Over the two years of writing Hope, she learned her craft, which prepared her for God connecting her with Mr. Muntean to author, Willing to Die.

A rough partial outline for the book was written by John Muntean, that and a total of 107 interviews brings the story and John’s warning to America to light.

Josephine Walker is the penname for Jo Walker, a member of ACFW. A mother of three grown children, grandmother of eleven, widowed in 2011.


Connect with Jo here:
: http://ambassador-international.com/books/willing-to-die-the-true-story-of-john-muntean
Personal site: www.josephinewalker.com
Email: josephinewalker08@gmail.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jo.walker.9809
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AuthorJosephine



Jo is giving away a copy of Willing to Die.
The giveaway is only available to U.S. addresses.

To be entered in the book giveaway, leave a comment along with your email address. You may enter the book giveaway twice--once on each spotlight post. (It's not too late to go back and leave a comment on yesterday's post)



Happy Reading!
Caroline Brown
 

 

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